5 Timeless Truths for the Writer

by Cherrilynn Bisbano Some things never change, and so it goes with writing. As a speaker, I sought clarity on a career in writing. Many ladies requested my teachings in book format. My apt reply, I am not a writer. I had no desire to write. A friend encouraged me to attend a nearby writers’
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Transitions: The secret to excellent story flow

by Gina Burgess She looked at his expressionless face and wondered what he was thinking. She remembered that key, and the box it opened. Bernice might know. Bernice was the neighborhood gossip and tidbit collector. Betty tried to quit thinking about Bob to no avail. She looked out of her window and saw his car.
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Why are classics still powerful today?

by Gina Burgess Several years ago an author sent to publishers in London, England several of Jane Austin’s classics: “Pride and Prejudice”, “Northanger Abby”, and “Persuasion” with his name on them. He did this because he was bumfuzzeled why his own work, a thriller, had not been bought. Only one publisher called the author on
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Moral Arc in Literature

By Genevieve Fosa A transcendentalist named Theodore Parker once said that the “… arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice.” Many people feel that it wobbles considerably on its way towards this justice. This is where the term moral arc of a story comes from. Though some stories do not
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Fiction is Fiction, Right?

by Gina Burgess Well apparently it isn’t. In a newspaper story, echoed by a Vanity Fair story, a few years ago, Katheryn Stockett was under fire for her character Aibilene in her blockbuster book The Help. It is a story about the relationships between the white families and their black maids back in the 1960s. It
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Naked Dialogue

by Randy Ingermanson   “What’s naked dialogue?” “It’s dialogue without any action, description, interior monologue, or interior emotion.” “Can you do that?” “In short stretches.” “Why would you do that? It sounds stupid.” “If the main conflict is in the dialogue, then adding anything else takes the edge off the conflict.” “I don’t believe that
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Systematic Editing

by Jann W. Martin I was at the Word Weavers Fall Retreat recently. I was in an invaluable workshop. My friend, and one of my editors, Kristen Stieffel, led the workshop. I have attended several of her workshops over the years. This one was her best so far. Kristen is in the process of writing
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Critiques are best when served warm

Hello from Jann, When you consider something from numerous perspectives you can easily see the whole picture rather than a tiny corner of your universe. This is why critique groups are an excellent way to get a broad perspective of your writing, which is a great way to prepare your manuscript before you have to
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post

Chew on This Writers: Organization

by Randy Ingermanson [Editor’s note: Fodder for thoughtful planning now, gearing up for January 2019] Organization: Evolution, Not Revolution January is the big-money month of the year, I suspect, for people who run gyms. And people who sell diet plans. And anyone promising to make you over fast. We all want a revolution in our
Click View Post Button To Read Full Post