4 Steps for a Less Stressful Thanksgiving

by Jann Martin If you aren’t careful about getting ready for Thanksgiving, it can be very stressful. It seems like such a huge task. There are so many things to plan and prepare. Take a deep breath. You can do it. You need to make a plan for what will be done when. It will
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Determining ROI–or Success Rate

by Tom Blubaugh I was talking to an author client/friend the other day about return-on-investment (ROI). 100 % of most conversations about ROI involve money. The thought came to me that money is not the only ROI that can give an author satisfaction. If it is, then many authors would discontinue writing today since, on
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Why a Writer Needs Relationships

by DiAnn Mills Writers spend hours perfecting their manuscripts. The time, sweat, and tears that go into a remarkable writing project can’t be measured when our ability to create is always working. We live and breathe the words filling our mind and transfer them onto the page. Some say writing is an isolated profession, and
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Working through the Gray

by Jeffery Romine When I was co-chair for a medicinal chemistry program, my counterpart often insisted that the success of our executive director, his immediate supervisor, a man who had achieved not only a position of authority but respect within the organization, was due to his remarkable ability to see through the gray. At any
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Inspiration with a Club

By Gina Burgess Truman Capote:Writing has laws of perspective, of light and shade just as painting does or music. If you are born with them, fine. If not, learn them then rearrange them to suit you. Just what we were talking about last week. Frankly, no two writers will work, or write, in the same way.
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Google+ going, going, gone

by Jann Martin We’ve been hearing lately that Google+ is shutting down. “When John Lewis heard that Google+ was shutting down after the discovery of a security bug that left private profile data exposed, it felt like a crushing blow — even though he could see it coming.” CNBC report In The Guardian “This March, as Facebook was
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Writing Rules the Good, the Bad, the Ugly

by Gina Burgess Like me, you may have wondered where in the world all those rules about writing came from. From people who supposedly know about writing. Duh. In one of my Facebook groups, someone asked, “What is the writing rule you dislike the most?” I’m amazed at some of the dislikes, so I thought
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A Blog Is an Author’s Best Friend

By Gina Burgess Last May we talked a little bit about authors blogging, why and what to blog. Something missing is how an author should maintain the blog. Where to get inspiration for blog posts? I’ve been writing blog posts since 2005 when my professor challenged us to create a blog for a class project.
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Where do you place your inciting incident?

by Randy Ingermanson First, let’s define our terms. The inciting incident is some “new thing” in your protagonist’s world. It marks the change that is ultimately going to pull your protagonist into your story. Usually, this is something external to your protagonist, but it’s possible it could be an internal change. Exactly where to put
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Web-Ed EVENT! Terry Whalin, acquisitions editor

By Gina Burgess First flush of love finally blossoms into full-fledged, lasting love that ends with accepting a proposal. Like an on-the-knee marriage proposal, an accepted book proposal leads to long relationships, trusted relationships, and even better, profit for both parties. Terry Whalin–an acquisitions editor for Morgan-James Publishing–has the scoop on how to write a
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