Bar Jokes for English Majors (and Authors)

Found this jewel through another blog. Being a wordsmith, I was delighted by each of these and I learned something, too! You should check out her blog, too, by clicking the link. I couldn’t find her name, but she’s a genius! By Bluebird of Bitterness Bar jokes for English majors A dangling participle walks into a […]

Craft: Proactive and Reactive Scenes

by Randy Ingermanson It sounds horribly old-fashioned to say this, but once a month, I go to a critique group with real, live writers. These days, it seems that most writers communicate electronically. That’s all fine, but it’s just more fun to get together in person, so we do it. One of the most common […]

3 Ways to Handle the Overwhelm of too Many Story Ideas

by Jennifer Harris As writers we’re creative and that means story ideas tend to pop up at every turn. Just sitting at a traffic light observing what’s happening around us could be the starting point for a complete novel! Pretty soon our brains become overpopulated with ideas until we find ourselves overwhelmed, stuck, or jumping […]

Improve Your Writing with Story Circles

by Margaret Welwood They say—and I agree—that reading your story out loud helps you to detect awkward places. If you stumble, so will your reader. But what of reading other authors’ stories out loud—stories that you and your (grand)children enjoy? I read at day cares, the museum, the library, and other venues, reasoning that as […]

Getting your creative groove back

  by Gina Burgess   I was yawning big time just trying to get that photo on the newsletter. What is it about the middle of winter (and a major winter storm) that keeps our hibernation mode in gear? Here it is a whole week after getting back to work and I’m still moving like […]

The Benefits of Stream-of-Consciousness Writing

by Sarah Tun Writing stream-of-consciousness is a kind of brainstorming without a central theme, point or purpose. Have you ever written without objective or purpose? It’s like painting a picture of what’s before your eyes, without knowing what the boundaries are, or the medium, or even whether or not you’ll include all of what you […]

3 Ways to Show, Not Tell

by Jennifer Harris You’ve heard it a hundred times, if not a thousand: show, don’t tell. But do you know what that really means? Almost every writer struggles with this concept at one point in their writing career. But once you learn the difference, and put it into practice, you’ll be amazed at how quickly […]

Of Hawks and Mice, and Writers’ Friends

by Margaret Welwood You Can Go Home Again, the title assures us. But as three mice run for cover from a diving hawk, we forget the title. Mother mouse hurries the children into a rock crevasse in front of her, and the hawk accelerates, extending its talons . . . . So why do we—children […]

What Do the Best Writers Do?

…That Other Writers Don’t? by Joel Klettke [Editor’s note: While this is specifically for non-fiction writers, don’t miss the golden nuggets here that will smooth the paths for fiction writers.] As someone who both writes and manages a writing team, I’ve often wondered why some writers need very little editing or coaching while others need […]

Description Now and Then

Sophie Dawson A while back on a forum there was a question about narrative description. The posting author mentioned how in today’s novels the descriptions were not nearly as detailed as in the past. He wondered why. Now I’ve never really been a show stopper but my post ended the thread pretty abruptly. What had […]